Vegetables from Member Gardens

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All the pictures and commentary in this slideshow of vegetables from member gardens are provided by McFadden Ranch (Marilyn and Jim) unless otherwise indicated.

Vegetables are easy to grow here; the main problem is gophers. For that reason many use raised beds.

Click here for the San Diego Master Gardener's web site guide to planting vegetables and here for Master Gardener Joyce Hemmer's Guide

This the first corn plot of the year which was well on its way. The stamen that contains the pollen is located at the top of the stalk.
These are the corn tassels. Each tassel corresponds to a kernel of corn. Each corn kernel is an ovary. The pollen falls from the stamen at the top of the corn stalk onto a tassel.
The pollen falls or slides down the tassel to the ovary or corn kernel where, when pollination is complete, a corn kernel forms.
Here you can see pollen falling off the stamen on a corn plant. This pollen falls to the tassle below.
Use gourds for crafts, for ornamental displays, or to educate others about their use in our rich American Indian culture.
Gourds are easy to grow on a homemade trellis.
Moths and bats help to pollinate these night owls as gourd flowers bloom after the sun goes down.
We still hand make our bean and pea trellises each year. There is something very special about this ritual that fills us with great satisfaction as we see the lush vines make their way higher to the sun.
  • This the first corn plot of the year which was well on its way. The stamen that contains the pollen is located at the top of the stalk.
  • These are the corn tassels. Each tassel corresponds to a kernel of corn. Each corn kernel is an ovary. The pollen falls from the stamen at the top of the corn stalk onto a tassel.
  • The pollen falls or slides down the tassel to the ovary or corn kernel where, when pollination is complete, a corn kernel forms.
  • Here you can see pollen falling off the stamen on a corn plant. This pollen falls to the tassle below.
  • Use gourds for crafts, for ornamental displays, or to educate others about their use in our rich
American Indian culture.
  • Gourds are easy to grow on a homemade trellis.
  • Moths and bats help to pollinate these night owls as gourd flowers bloom after the sun goes down.
  • We still hand make our bean and pea trellises each year. There is something very special about this ritual that fills us with great satisfaction as we see the lush vines make their way higher to the sun.

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