Local Wildlife and Insects

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All the pictures and commentary in this slideshow of our local critters are provided by McFadden Ranch (Marilyn and Jim) unless otherwise indicated

Alligator lizards help to control unwelcome visitors. Their regular diet includes black widows and brown widows, two residents we prefer to evict.
Dragonflies are beneficial on the land and in the water. As nymphs, they eat mosquito larvae and as adults they eat other insects. http://www.dragonfly-site.com/what-do-dragonflies-eat.html
The burrowing pocket gopher wreaks havoc in our garden and orchard. While all animals have a niche, this particular one is deemed a pest. UC Davis has this pest note for them: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7433.html
An unusual pollinator, the Metallic Green Bee.
Look closely at this morning glory and you will find a carpenter bee with pollen that is stuck to the very fine hairs on its legs.
No, we don't like grasshoppers here. They eat big holes in the leaves of our plants and can destroy their process of photosynthesis. See http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74103.html
An orb weaver spider has captured a big fly in the orchard where the large web stretches between large citrus trees. We consider these non-venomous arachnids to be part of our pest control management system.
This striped cucumber beetle on a squash blossom is a local pest that enjoys eating garden vines and other vegetable garden plants, see http://www.cucumberbeetles.com/
Manduca quinquemaculata aka the tomato worm. UC Davis pest note: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r783300111.html
Gopher snakes such as this one help to control the rodent population which can be very destructive to our Lakeside gardens This fine reptile was eating a large rat when we inadvertently discovered him.
California Legless Lizard, Anniella pulchra, is another insect eater you may find when digging up your garden: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Anniella_pulchra/
  • Alligator lizards help to control unwelcome visitors. Their regular diet includes black widows and brown widows, two residents we prefer to evict.
  • Dragonflies are beneficial on the land and in the water. As nymphs, they eat mosquito larvae and as adults they eat other insects. http://www.dragonfly-site.com/what-do-dragonflies-eat.html
  • The burrowing pocket gopher wreaks havoc in our garden and orchard. While all animals have a niche, this particular one is deemed a pest. UC Davis has this pest note for them: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7433.html
  •  An unusual pollinator, the Metallic Green Bee.
  • Look closely at this morning glory and you will find a carpenter bee with pollen that is stuck to the very fine hairs on its legs.
  • No, we don't like grasshoppers here. They eat big holes in the leaves of our plants and can destroy their process of photosynthesis. See http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74103.html
  • An orb weaver spider has captured a big fly in the orchard where the large web stretches between large citrus trees. We consider these non-venomous arachnids to be part of our pest control management system.
  • This striped cucumber beetle on a squash blossom is a local pest that enjoys eating garden vines and other vegetable garden plants, see http://www.cucumberbeetles.com/
  • Manduca quinquemaculata aka the tomato worm. UC Davis pest note: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r783300111.html
  • Gopher snakes such as this one help to control the rodent population which can be very destructive to our Lakeside gardens  This fine reptile was eating a large rat when we inadvertently discovered him.
  • California Legless Lizard, Anniella pulchra, is another insect eater you may find when digging up your garden: http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Anniella_pulchra/

Here are some of the URLs listed in the slide show:

PESTS:

Gophers:

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7433.html

Cucumber Beetle:

http://www.cucumberbeetles.com/

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r116300511.html

Grasshoppers:

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74103.html

BENEFICIALS:

Dragonfly:

 http://www.dragonfly-site.com/what-do-dragonflies-eat.html

Alligator Lizard:

http://www.californiaherps.com/identification/lizardsid/elgaria.id.html

California Legless Lizard:

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Anniella_pulchra/

 

 

 

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