Birds in our member gardens

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All the pictures and commentary in this slideshow of  birds from member gardens are provided by McFadden Ranch (Marilyn and Jim) unless otherwise indicated

 

A migratory species, this Hooded Oriole (male), is foraging for insects and nectar on this First Prize rose bush.
When a bird like this mockingbird - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mockingbird -feeds for itself it simply picks up the insect of choice and eats it on the spot. We can tell this fellow is feeding a brood because he is gathering the insects and holding them in his beak
Lakeside has wild parrots. You can participate in research by reportingt your sighting at: http://californiaparrotproject.org/
Blue Jay Juvenile. The parents dropped him off at “Mulberry Daycare” and didn't come back to pick him up. I think it's called "kicking him out of the nest."
This fountain, recycled from a Craigslist ad, has proven to be one of the most interesting and frequented gathering places. In this shot the Cedar Waxwings have taken center stage.
Medium sized Red-shouldered hawks, like this one found in Margaret Yorio's garden, are year-round residents in Lakeside. These raptors control rodent populations and eat small birds. They typically make their presence known with vocalizations but they are stealthy hunters, often sitting in a nearby tree without detection. (Photo: Margaret Yorio)
California thrashers are regular visitors to Lakeside gardens. They forage for insects just below the soil surface as well as on the plants.
This house wren has fledged two broods so far this year. By doing so, he is meeting the needs of his growing family's demands by catching bugs that could potentially harm our garden.
Hooded Oriole eating the mulberries
One of our many year round residents is the Anna’s hummingbird (female), taking nectar from a Cape Honeysuckle bush.
Mourning dove pair.
he Western Tanager male (mature) migrates to our Lakeside region for spring nesting. These tree-top forgers eat many insects as well as fruit and nectar. To learn more about this species visit: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Western_Tanager/lifehistory
A thrush taking a sprinkler bath.
Birds of prey are especially helpful at controlling rodent populations. However, after seeing this Red-tailed hawk on our owl nesting box, we think we figured out why the owls did not nest there this year.
  • A migratory species, this Hooded Oriole (male), is foraging for insects and nectar on this First Prize rose bush.
  •  When a bird like this mockingbird  - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mockingbird -feeds for itself it simply picks up the insect of choice and eats it on the spot. We can tell this fellow is feeding a brood because he is gathering the insects and holding them in his beak
  •  Lakeside has wild parrots. You can participate in research by reportingt your sighting at: http://californiaparrotproject.org/
  • Blue Jay Juvenile. The parents dropped him off at “Mulberry Daycare” and didn't come back to pick him up. I think it's called "kicking him out of the nest."
  •  This fountain, recycled from a Craigslist ad, has proven to be one of the most interesting and frequented gathering places. In this shot the Cedar Waxwings have taken center stage.
  • Medium sized Red-shouldered hawks, like this one found in Margaret Yorio's garden, are year-round residents in Lakeside.  These raptors control rodent populations and eat small birds.  They typically make their presence known with vocalizations but they are stealthy hunters, often sitting in a nearby tree without detection.  (Photo:  Margaret Yorio)
  • California thrashers are regular visitors to Lakeside gardens. They forage for insects just below the soil surface as well as on the plants.
  • This house wren has fledged two broods so far this year. By doing so, he is meeting the needs of his growing family's demands by catching bugs that could potentially harm our garden.
  • Hooded Oriole eating the mulberries
  • One of our many year round residents is the Anna’s hummingbird (female), taking nectar from a Cape Honeysuckle bush.
  • Mourning dove pair.
  • he Western Tanager male (mature) migrates to our Lakeside region for spring nesting. These tree-top forgers eat many insects as well as fruit and nectar.  To learn more about this species visit: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Western_Tanager/lifehistory
  • A thrush taking a sprinkler bath.
  • Birds of prey are especially helpful at controlling rodent populations. However, after seeing this Red-tailed hawk on our owl nesting box, we think we figured out why the owls did not nest there this year.

Put your cursor on a photo to stop the show on that image.

Here are some of the links listed in the show and others of interest:

 

 

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